Masur and McAdams on Police Violence in “The Wire” @jonathanmasur

Jonathan S. Masur and Richard H. McAdams, both of the University of Chicago Law School, are publishing Police Violence in The Wire in the University of Chicago Legal Forum (2018). Here is the abstract. That police brutality is a common occurrence in HBO’s The Wire does not set it apart from other filmic depictions of police. What is distinctive is the fact that police violence is neither condoned nor relegated exclusively to a few “bad apples.” Instead, The Wire depicts structural causes of police violence by showing how organizational dysfunction…

Humboldt University of Berlin Workshop @HumboldtUni

Law & Humanities Blog: Political Theology and the Contemporary Moment: Beyond the Christian and the Secular: Humboldt University of Berlin Workshop @HumboldtUni skip to main | skip to sidebar Political Theology and the Contemporary Moment: Beyond the Christian and the Secular: Humboldt University of Berlin Workshop @HumboldtUni Political Theology and the Contemporary Moment: Beyond the Christian and the Secular A Two-Day Workshop at the Humboldt University of Berlin Humboldt-Universität zu BerlinTheologische FakultätBurgstr. 26, 10178 Berlin The workshop is free and open to all. No registration is required. Kirill Chepurin (HU…

Television and the “Woman in Jeopardy”

Allison Yarrow investigates the plight of the “Woman in Jeopardy” on 1990s television. She points both to real-life women like Mary Jo Buffacuoco, Amy Fisher’s victim, and the numerous main characters of made for tv movies that populated the airwaves. Says Ms. Yarrow in part, Network executives told the press that Jep films empowered women characters, enabling them to assume qualities they weren’t normally given by television writers and producers. Women in Jep could “cajole, demand, infiltrate, investigate and settle scores,” all in the name of offing a threatening man-monster,…

Law, Time[,] and Bruegel’s Justice @ANU_Law

Desmond Manderson, ANU College of Law; ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences; McGill University Faculty of Law, is publishing Blindness Visible: Law, Time and Bruegel’s Justice in Law and the Visual (Desmond Manderson ed., University of Toronto Press, 2018). Here is the abstract. Printed in 1559, Bruegel’s ‘Justicia’ appears at first glance to be a spatial representation of law—a snapshot, a mis en scène. But it is essentially about time. Bruegel’s image overlays three different perspectives on the hitherto unexplored relationship between time, responsibility, and legal authority, revealing the…

Peterson on Chancellor Kent and the Collaborative Era of American Statutory Interpretation

Farah Peterson, University of Virginia School of Law, is publishing Interpretation as Statecraft: Chancellor Kent and the Collaborative Era of American Statutory Interpretation in volume 77 of the Maryland Law Review (2018). Here is the abstract. In the Early Republic, American judges acted as collaborators with state legislatures. They took on interpretive powers that blurred the line modern scholars expect to find between the legislative and judicial branches of government. Download the article from SSRN at the link. Source link

Law & Humanities Blog: Critical Legal Conference 2018: Registration Open

From the CLC2018 Committee: We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Critical Legal Conference 2018: Regeneration at The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK from 6-8th September 2018 (doctoral workshop on afternoon of 5th September). Registration is through Eventbrite and you can find a link to register, as well as the Call for papers and panels and other conference details on the Conference webpage. The Call for Papers and Panels will close at midnight on 31 July 2018. Registration will close at midday on Monday 6th August 2018. If you…

Rhetorical Devices in the Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

It is according to Aristotle that a speaker or writer has three ways to persuade his audience: The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second is on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third is on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself. One of the most influential people who made a memorable speech for the past century is President John F. Kennedy, a famous public speaker who wrote an inaugural address that contains a…

UK Government Wants Businesses to Do More for New Parents

Shared parental leave to level the gender playing field As of 1 December this year, fathers now have the same rights as mothers when it comes to taking leave from work following the birth of a child. For all babies due after April 2015, employers must offer shared parental leave of up to 50 weeks, rather than the father's usual fortnight. Pathhers use holiday allowance for maternity In a move that has been warmly welcomed by a generation of working mothers, parents can now choose how to split their paternity…

Bond on Atticus Finch in the Law School Classroom

Cynthia D. Bond, The John Marshall Law School, is publishing To Kill a Lawyer-Hero: Atticus Finch in the Law School Classroom in volume 45 of the Rutgers Law Record (2018). Here is the abstract. This article addresses the well-known lawyer character from Harper Lee’s novel and subsequent film, To Kill a Mockingbird. For years, legal scholars have rhapsodized about Atticus Finch as the ultimate “lawyer-hero” and role model for aspiring attorneys, with little dissent. When Lee’s literary executor published an early draft version of the novel entitled Go Set a…

Sekhri on Police, the Third Degree, and Indian Courts: 1861-1961

Abhinav Sekhri, Delhi High Court, has published From ‘Bully Boys’ to ‘Willing Servants’: Police, the Third Degree, and Indian Courts: 1861-1961. Here is the abstract. This paper examines the development of India’s statutory and constitutional rules to forestall improper police practices designed to compel self-incrimination. Focusing on the period between 1861-1961, it describes how the judiciary consistently limited the potential of this legal framework to police the police. This was due to the choice of interpreting the rules as a means to ensure reliability of evidence, rather than as safeguards…