English Law

English law is practised worldwide as many legal systems are based on English Common Law. Over the years, countries have modified this to reflect their needs but its influence is still evident within the legal policies and traditions of many countries, including several American States. There are countries which have steadfastly adhered to English legal traditions and they have retained the Privy Council in London as their ultimate Court of Appeal. Others have replaced wigs and gowns with more modern attire, legal terminology have been replaced by plain terms and…

Family Court Violence – When Psychiatry and Law Serve As the Batterer's Club

Institutionalizing battered women in psychiatric hospitals is as old as prostitution. It's an effective way to silence and discredit them. In My Own Practice I remember a case over 20 years ago in my own practice of a patient referred by a social worker for a stress-related neuromuscular disorder. The referring social worker informed me that the young man's birth mother was a schizophrenic who had been institutionalized when he was around five years old. In my diagnostic interview with the patient, I was stuck by the fact that it…

Nijman on Seeking Change By Doing History

Janne Elisabeth Nijman, T. M. C. Asser Institut, Amsterdam Center for International Law, University of Amsterdam, has published Seeking Change by Doing History (2018). Here is the abstract. In her Inaugural Lecture Janne E. Nijman explores the so-called ‘Turn to History’ in international legal scholarship. Interest in the intellectual history or ‘history of ideas’ of international law has surged around the last turn of the century. A new sub-field has thus emerged: ‘History and Theory of International Law’. Nijman contextualises this development and stages three possible approaches of why and…

ABA Announces Silver Gavel Awards Winners For 2018 @ABAesq

The American Bar Association has announced the winners of the 2018 Silver Gavel Awards for Media and the Arts. BOOKS Silver Gavel: Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission, by Barry Friedman.Honorable Mention: In Praise of Litigation, by Alexandra Lahav. DOCUMENTARIESSilver Gavel: And Then They Came for Us, by Ginzberg Productions.Honorable Mention: They Call Us Monsters, by BMP Films. DRAMA & LITERATURESilver Gavel: Marshall, directed and produced by Reginald Hudlin. NEWSPAPERSSilver Gavel: “Death-Penalty Defense Drama at Guantánamo War Court,” featured in the Miami Herald.Honorable Mention: “Secrecy Rules,” featured in the Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minnesota. RADIOSilver Gavel: Breakdown Season 6:…

Maillard on Hollywood Loving @noblemaillard

Kevin Noble Maillard, Syracuse University College of Law, is publishing Hollywood Loving in volume 86 of the Fordham Law Review (2018). Here is the abstract. In this Essay, I highlight how nongovernmental entities establish political, moral, and sexual standards through visual media, which powerfully underscores and expresses human behavior. Through the Motion Picture Production Code (the “Hays Code”) and the Code of Practices for Television Broadcasters (the “TV Code”), Americans viewed entertainment as a pre-mediated, engineered world that existed outside of claims of censorship and propaganda. This Essay critically examines…

Goold on the Lost Tort of Moral Rights Invasion @harvard_law

Patrick Russell Goold, Harvard Law School, is publishing The Lost Tort of Moral Rights Invasion in the Akron Law review. Here is the abstract. Moral rights are often portrayed as an unwelcome import into U.S. law. During the nineteenth century, European lawmakers, influenced by personality theories of authorship, began granting authors rights of attribution and integrity. However, while these rights proliferated in Europe and international copyright treaties, they were not adopted in the United States. According to a common historical narrative, U.S. courts and lawmakers resisted moral rights because they…

Law & Humanities Blog: Cummings on Law and Social Movements: Reimagining the Progressive Canon

Scott L. Cummings, UCLA School of Law, is publishing Law and Social Movements: Reimagining the Progressive Canon in the Wisconsin Law Review (2018). Here is the abstract. This Article examines the “progressive legal canon” — iconic legal campaigns to advance progressive causes — and explores the implications of canon construction and critique for the study of lawyers and social movements. Looking backward, it reflects on why specific cases, like Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade, have become fundamental to progressive understandings of the role that lawyers play…

Name-Calling and Bullying Students and Doubters @tjsl

Bryan H. Wildenthal, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, is publishing Shapiro ‘On the Media’: Name-Calling and Bullying Students and Doubters in the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship Newsletter (2018). Here is the abstract. For far too long, when it comes to the Shakespeare Authorship Question (SAQ), orthodox academics, whatever their motivations, have largely avoided the simple duty that any serious scholar has: to engage forthrightly with the evidence. Instead, such scholars, when they deign to mention the SAQ at all, have focused almost entirely on trying to denigrate or psychoanalyze authorship doubters.…

Crime Fiction as World Literature (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017) @jcalvo11 @BloomsburyBooks

Via @jcalvo 11: ICYMI: Crime Fiction as World Literature (Louise Nilsson, David Damrosch, and Theo D’haen, eds., Bloomsbury Publishing 2017). Here from the publisher’s website is a description of the book’s contents. While crime fiction is one of the most widespread of all literary genresSchedule, this is the first book to treat it in its full global is the first book to treat crime fiction in its full global and plurilingual dimensions, taking the genre seriously as a participant in the international sphere of world literature. In a wide-ranging panorama…

Christiana Gregoriou, Crime Fiction Migration (Bloomsbury, 2017) @c_gregoriou @BloomsburyBooks

ICYMI: Christiana Gregoriou, Crime Fiction Migration: Crossing Languages, Cultures and Media (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017) (Advances in Stylistics). Here from the publisher’s website is a description of the book’s contents. Crime narratives form a large and central part of the modern cultural landscape. This book explores the cognitive stylistic processing of prose and audiovisual fictional crime ‘texts’. It also examines instances where such narratives find themselves, through popular demand, ‘migrating’ – meaning that they cross languages, media formats and/or cultures. In doing so, Crime Fiction Migration proposes a move from a…