Who has been Britain’s best housing minister?




“With every new housing minister comes a new set of empty promises about improving the state of the market but we’ve seen very little action, particularly of late.”

Despite Gavin Barwell’s relatively short 11-month term as housing minister, he has had the most success in the last eight years where new housing is concerned, according to Emoov research.

With 184,460 homes completed during his tenure, an average of 16,769 per month or 559 per day, Gavin Barwell tops the list based on the number of dwellings completed to the time he was in office.

Second to Gavin Barwell is Alok Sharma. During his even shorter seven-month term, there were a total of 184,460 dwellings completed. That’s 12,113 each month, or 470 dwellings a day.

Brandon Lewis oversaw a more impressive number of properties during his tenure with 328,110 completed. However, as he held the position for two years, this equates to 13,671 houses a month (456 a day), making him the third most successful.

Chris Hopkins’ nine-month stint saw just over 100,000 dwellings completed, 12,082 houses monthly and 403 houses daily.

Grant Shapps spent 30 months in the role, and during this time there was a total of 348,770 dwellings completed. However, that equates to just 11,621 each month (388 a day). As a result, he is the third least successful minister when it comes to the quantity of homes built during the time frame.

Mark Prosk oversaw 10,304 homes a month or 343 a day in his 13 months as housing minister.

Finally, Dominic Rabb who was the last appointment before Kit Malthouse in July, had just six months in office and predictably oversaw the lowest number of homes in comparison to his predecessors at a rate of 6,468 monthly and 216 daily.

Russell Quirk, founder and CEO of Emoov, commented: “The problem that is continuing to plague the UK housing market is the lack of housing available to meet demand. With every new housing minister comes a new set of empty promises about improving the state of the market but we’ve seen very little action, particularly of late.

“This certainly isn’t an attack on these individuals, in the same way that the number of dwellings built during their tenure isn’t completely down to them. But this research does highlight the fundamental issues with the current role of housing minister. First of all, they need to be given the power by the government to actually plan and implement a solution and secondly, they need to be given adequate time to do so.

“The current instability within the position does little to provide stability to the UK market and until it is taken more seriously, that will no doubt continue.”



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