Television and the “Woman in Jeopardy”

Allison Yarrow investigates the plight of the “Woman in Jeopardy” on 1990s television. She points both to real-life women like Mary Jo Buffacuoco, Amy Fisher’s victim, and the numerous main characters of made for tv movies that populated the airwaves. Says Ms. Yarrow in part, Network executives told the press that Jep films empowered women characters, enabling them to assume qualities they weren’t normally given by television writers and producers. Women in Jep could “cajole, demand, infiltrate, investigate and settle scores,” all in the name of offing a threatening man-monster,…

Law, Time[,] and Bruegel’s Justice @ANU_Law

Desmond Manderson, ANU College of Law; ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences; McGill University Faculty of Law, is publishing Blindness Visible: Law, Time and Bruegel’s Justice in Law and the Visual (Desmond Manderson ed., University of Toronto Press, 2018). Here is the abstract. Printed in 1559, Bruegel’s ‘Justicia’ appears at first glance to be a spatial representation of law—a snapshot, a mis en scène. But it is essentially about time. Bruegel’s image overlays three different perspectives on the hitherto unexplored relationship between time, responsibility, and legal authority, revealing the…

Peterson on Chancellor Kent and the Collaborative Era of American Statutory Interpretation

Farah Peterson, University of Virginia School of Law, is publishing Interpretation as Statecraft: Chancellor Kent and the Collaborative Era of American Statutory Interpretation in volume 77 of the Maryland Law Review (2018). Here is the abstract. In the Early Republic, American judges acted as collaborators with state legislatures. They took on interpretive powers that blurred the line modern scholars expect to find between the legislative and judicial branches of government. Download the article from SSRN at the link. Source link

Law & Humanities Blog: Critical Legal Conference 2018: Registration Open

From the CLC2018 Committee: We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Critical Legal Conference 2018: Regeneration at The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK from 6-8th September 2018 (doctoral workshop on afternoon of 5th September). Registration is through Eventbrite and you can find a link to register, as well as the Call for papers and panels and other conference details on the Conference webpage. The Call for Papers and Panels will close at midnight on 31 July 2018. Registration will close at midday on Monday 6th August 2018. If you…

Japanese knotweed causes no significant structural damage, study finds

“We found nothing to suggest that Japanese knotweed causes significant damage to buildings – even when it is growing in close proximity” A new study found no evidence that Japanese knotweed causes significant structural damage and its ecologists concluded that automatically refusing mortgages on properties where Japanese knotweed is found is “out of proportion to the risk posed by this invasive species”. Ecologists from global infrastructure services firm AECOM and the University of Leeds assessed the potential of Japanese knotweed to cause structural…

Kit Malthouse appointed new housing minister

“Over the last 20 years we have seen no less than 17 housing ministers with each spending an average of just 16 months in the position.” Kit Malthouse has been appointed housing minister to replace Dominic Raab who was promoted to Brexit secretary yesterday following the resignation of David Davis. Malthouse becomes the 15th housing minister in the past 17 years. He became an MP in 2015 representing North West Hampshire and since the beginning of the year has been parliamentary…

Think tank urges government to introduce five-year house price freeze

“With property transactions at an already low level, this sort of tampering could have unintended consequences.” Think tank IPPR says the Bank of England should be given an explicit house price inflation target, set by government, to reduce growth to zero per cent for an initial period of five years “to reset expectations”. The discussion paper, by IPPR researcher Grace Blakeley, outlines how the Treasury could introduce the mandate to allow affordability to improve. She points to the “self-reinforcing cycle in which…

Vida cuts buy-to-let fees to 1%

“These changes to our Fee Saver residential product and specialist BTL range show our continuing appetite to grow our specialist mortgage lending.” Vida Homeloans has introduced a new lower 1% fee for smaller buy-to-let loans. The 1% fee (minimum £495) is available on the Vida 1 tier up to a maximum loan size of £125,000, replacing the previous fixed fee of £1,995. Vida has also revamped its Fee Saver residential mortgage range. Properties up to £500,000 now qualify for a free valuation…