Zinos on Fundamental Rights in Early American Case Law: 1789-1859


Nicholas Zinos, Mitchell Hamline School of Law, is publishing Fundamental Rights in Early American Case Law: 1789-1859 in volume 7 of the British Journal of American Legal Studies (2018). Here is the abstract.

Fundamental Rights Law is a ubiquitous feature of modern American jurisprudence. Where did the term “Fundamental Rights” come from, and how was it applied in early American case law? This article outlines the genesis of fundamental rights law in early 17th century England and how this law developed and was applied over time. The English Bill of Rights of 1689 was the first attempt to codify these rights in English law. When the English legal system emigrated to America along with the early American colonists, it included the English conception of fundamental rights. The framers of the United States Constitution incorporated and expanded these rights. Early American Case law kept strictly within this tradition for the most past, and used the term “fundamental rights” usually for rights which had long been recognized in Anglo-American society. This article notes the concordance between the application of fundamental rights in early American case law and the long tradition of fundamental rights which ripened in the Anglo-American legal tradition.

Download the article from SSRN at the link.



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